Idmc Grid 2017

Global Report
on Internal
Displacement

The Global Report on Internal Displacement presents the latest information on internal displacement worldwide caused by conflict, violence and disasters.

On the GRID:
Internal displacement in 2016 Download Report Part 1 on the grid


There were 31.1 million new internal displacements by conflict, violence and disasters in 2016. This is the equivalent of one person forced to flee every second.

New displacements by conflict and disasters in 2016 Tweet this map
  • Conflict
  • Disasters

The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map
do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by IDMC.

The country name and the figure are shown only when the value exceeds 20,000 people displaced

NEW DISPLACEMENTS - CONFLICT

There were 6.9 million new internal displacements by conflict and violence in 2016. Sub-Saharan Africa overtook the Middle East as the region most affected, with almost one million new displacements in the Democratic Republic of Congo as a result of violent clashes in the provinces of North Kivu, South Kivu and Kasa.

Significant levels of displacement continued in the Middle East, with Syria, Iraq and Yemen experiencing close to two million new displacements in total during 2016.

New displacements by conflict and violence by World Bank-defined region in 2016 Tweet this chart
  • Sub-Saharan Africa 38.0% - 2.6m
  • Middle East and North Africa 30.7% - 2.1m
  • South Asia 15.9% - 1.1m
  • Latin america and the Caribbean 6.3% - 0.4m
  • East Asia and the Pacific 4.6% - 0.3m
  • Europe and Central Asia 4.5% - 0.3m

Source: IDMC, with World Bank data


Countries with most new displacements by conflict and violence in 2016 Tweet this chart

Source: IDMC, with World Bank data


NEW DISPLACEMENTS - DISASTERS

There were 24.2 million new displacements by disasters in 2016. As in previous years, South and East Asia were the regions most affected. While China, India and the Philippines have the highest absolute numbers, small island states suffer disproportionately once population size is taken into account.

Countries with the most new displacements by disasters in 2016 Tweet this chart
  • Absolute (upper scale)
  • Relative (lower scale)

Source: IDMC, with UN Population Division data

Once again, weather-related hazards, in particular storms, brought on the majority of all new disaster displacements in 2016.

New displacements by disasters by hazard category, 2008 to 2016 Tweet this chart
  • Weather related 86.0% - 195.7m
  • Geophysical 14.0% - 31.9m

Source: IDMC


Low and lower middle income countries bear the brunt of internal displacement every year. The majority of new displacements in 2016 took place in high-risk environments characterised by low coping capacity, high levels of socio-economic vulnerability, and high exposure to natural and human made hazards

New displacements by conflict and disasters in 2016, disaggregated by INFORM risk levels in the countries concerned Tweet this chart

inform risk index

  • 4.5% - 1.1m
  • 14.4% - 3.5m
  • 62.3% - 4.3m
  • 15.9% - 3.3m
  • 0.1% - 26,000
  • 33.0% - 2.3m
  • 65.1% - 15.7m
  • 4.7% - 0.3m

  • Very high
  • High
  • Medium
  • Low
  • Very low

Source: IDMC, with INFORM data

TOTAL HEADCOUNT

By the end of 2016 there were 40.3 million people living in internal displacement as a result of conflict and violence in the world. This number has nearly doubled since 2000 and has increased sharply over the last five years.

An unknown number of people remain displaced as a result of disasters that occurred in and prior to 2016.

Off the GRID:
Are today’s IDPs tomorrow’s refugees and migrants? Download Report Part 2: off the grid


There are currently twice as many IDPs as refugees in the world. Despite its global scale, the issue of internal displacement remains largely overshadowed, particularly with the current global focus and public attention on refugees and migrants.

Refugees and IDPs displaced by conflict and violence, 1990 to 2016 Tweet this map
  • IDPs
  • Refugees

Source: IDMC, with UNHCR and UNRWA data


Although there is an obvious link between internal and cross-border displacement, the exact push and pull factors that explain how someone who is an IDP one day can become a refugee, an asylum seeker or an international migrant the next are still unclear.

Six of the ten countries that produced the most refugees in 2015 – Afghanistan, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, South Sudan, Sudan and Syria – were also among the ten with the largest number of IDPs.

Countries with high numbers of IDPs and producing significant refugee flows Tweet this map
  • Number of people displaced as:
  • IDPs in 2016
  • Refugees in 2015

Source: IDMC, with UNHCR data


Refugees returning to their countries of origin risk becoming internally displaced again if their return is premature, involuntary or unprepared, and if they return to conditions of insecurity and inadequate livelihoods. This was the case in Afghanistan and Somalia in 2016.

Better evidence is needed to improve future responses. We need to understand:

  • how many IDPs cross borders
  • the factors that determine their onward and cross-border flight
  • the circumstances under which they return to their countries of origin.

Inside the GRID:
Overcoming data shortfalls Download Report Part 2: inside the grid


Reliable data and analysis are central to the achievement of global and regional development and humanitarian policy processes relevant to displacement. IDMC’s data serves as the baseline to measure progress towards these targets, including the former UN Secretary General’s call to “reduce new and protracted internal displacement by 2030” by at least 50 per cent.

The current global baseline is, however, incomplete. IDMC faces recurring problems in painting an accurate picture, including:

  • incomplete data on the start, dynamics and duration of displacement
  • difficulties detecting repeated, secondary and onward movements
  • limited disaggregated data on IDPs’ profile and location
  • outdated information on certain IDP caseloads

Conclusion


Over the last 20 years IDMC has been calling for more data and more investment in addressing the causes of internal displacement. In light of the grim evidence we publish each year, we can only conclude the following:

1

There is a gulf between aspiration and reality. Rather than the number of IDPs halving by 2030, we expect displacement to continue increasing in the future, because there is insufficient attention to the underlying causes of crises.

2

The extent of international attention, resources and political will does not match the scale of displacement and human suffering. There are few meaningful signs of political will to address the global crisis of internal displacement.

3

Evidence alone is not enough. Each year, IDMC provides robust, compelling evidence on internal displacement. Each year, the evidence fails to elicit a response commensurate with the scale of the problem. Why? Because of international indifference, lack of accountability, and state failure to protect.

Call to Action

In anticipation of 2018, which will mark the 20th anniversary of the UN Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, we call on all states to respect the commitments they have made to account for and protect IDPs on their territories. We call for a conscious, deliberate and sustained political effort to improve the many millions of lives blighted by internal displacement and preventing others from suffering the same upheaval and trauma in the future. States need to recognise that national sovereignty implies responsibility, both “as a national obligation and a global imperative” (Francis Deng, 1996).


Media Pack


Language:
  • English
  • French
  • Arabic
  • Spanish
  • Chinese

More than 31 million people displaced within their own country in 2016

Conflict, violence and disasters caused 31.1 million new internal displacements in 2016, according to a new report released today by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC).

"In 2016, one person every second was forced to flee their home inside their own country. Internally displaced people now outnumber refugees by two to one. It is urgent to put internal displacement back on the global agenda," said Jan Egeland, Secretary General of the NRC.

Of the 6.9 million new internal displacements caused by conflict in 2016, 2.6 million took place in Sub-Saharan Africa, according to the Global Report on Internal Displacement. The Democratic Republic of the Congo was the country worst affected, with a spike of 922,000 new displacements during the year alone. Next were Syria (824,000), Iraq (659,000), Afghanistan (653,000), Nigeria (501,000) and Yemen (478,000). As of the end of 2016, a total of 40.3 million people were displaced within their own country as a result of conflict and violence, some of whom having been displaced for decades.

“Certain countries drop off the international agenda only to re-emerge a few years later with significant numbers of new displacements,” said Alexandra Bilak, Director of IDMC. “This was the case for the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which highlights how the failure to address the underlying causes of conflict and crisis results in cyclical patterns of displacement.”

Disasters displaced three times more people than conflicts. Most of the 24 million new disaster displacements recorded in 2016 were linked to sudden-onset weather hazards such as floods, storms, wildfires and severe winter conditions. Disaster displacement occurs mostly in low and lower-middle income countries, and is expected to increase in the future with the impacts of climate change and more extreme weather.

“Despite internal displacement being the starting point of many onward journeys, it has been overshadowed by the current global focus on refugees and migrants. We need to acknowledge that, without the right kind of support and protection, a person internally displaced today may become a refugee, an asylum seeker or an international migrant tomorrow,” said Bilak.

Yet more aid was spent last year on refugee resettlement within donor countries than in the countries where displacement crises originate.

The Global Report on Internal Displacement shows that displacement will continue unless we direct funding and political attention to the underlying drivers of poverty, state fragility and global environmental change.

“To the extent that the Global Report on Internal Displacement holds up a mirror, the reflection it projects is one of international indifference, lack of accountability and states’ failure to protect their own people,” said Bilak.

Download Global Press Release: English

Plus de 31 millions de personnes déplacées à l’intérieur de leur propre pays en 2016

Les conflits, la violence et les catastrophes ont provoqué 31,1 millions de nouveaux déplacements internes en 2016, selon le dernier rapport publié aujourd’hui par l’Observatoire des situations de déplacement interne (IDMC) et le Conseil norvégien pour les réfugiés (NRC).

« En 2016, une personne a été contrainte de fuir à l’intérieur de son pays toutes les secondes. Les personnes déplacées internes sont désormais deux fois plus nombreuses que les réfugiés. Il est urgent de remettre le problème des déplacements internes à l’ordre du jour de la communauté internationale », explique Jan Egeland, le secrétaire général du NRC.

Sur les 6,9 millions de nouveaux déplacements internes causés par les conflits en 2016, 2,6 millions ont été enregistrés en Afrique subsaharienne, selon le Rapport mondial sur les déplacements internes. Avec un pic de 922 000 nouveaux cas durant la seule année 2016, la République démocratique du Congo a été le pays le plus touché. Viennent ensuite la Syrie (824 000), l’Irak (659 000), l’Afghanistan (653 000), le Nigeria (501 000) et le Yémen (478 000). À la fin de l’année 2016, 40,3 millions de personnes au total vivaient en situation de déplacement dans leur propre pays en raison des conflits et de la violence, certaines depuis des décennies.

« Certains pays disparaissent de l’ordre du jour international avant de revenir sur le devant de la scène quelques années plus tard, en proie à de nouveaux déplacements massifs », rappelle Alexandra Bilak, directrice de l’IDMC. « Cela a été le cas de la République démocratique du Congo, pays qui illustre combien l’incapacité de s’attaquer aux causes profondes des conflits et des crises peut déboucher sur des déplacements cycliques. »

Les catastrophes ont contraint trois fois plus de personnes à fuir que les conflits. Sur les 24 millions de nouveaux cas causés par ce facteur en 2016, la plupart étaient liés à des aléas climatiques soudains, comme des inondations, des tempêtes, des feux de forêt et des hivers rigoureux. Les déplacements liés aux catastrophes ont principalement lieu dans les pays à faible revenu ou à revenu moyen inférieur et ils ne devraient cesser de se multiplier à l’avenir, sous l’effet du changement climatique et de la fréquence accrue des phénomènes météorologiques extrêmes.

« Bien que les déplacements internes soient le point de départ de nombreux périples au-delà des frontières, l’attention internationale dont bénéficient actuellement les réfugiés et les migrants vient occulter ce phénomène. Nous devons reconnaître que, faute d’une assistance et d’une protection appropriées, une personne déplacée à l’intérieur de son propre pays aujourd’hui peut devenir un réfugié, un demandeur d’asile ou un migrant international demain », insiste Alexandra Bilak.

Or, l’année dernière, les pays donateurs ont bénéficié d’une aide plus importante pour financer la réinstallation des réfugiés que les pays à l’origine des crises de déplacement.

Le rapport mondial de l’IDMC sur les déplacements internes montre que ces mouvements de population se poursuivront inexorablement à moins que le financement et l’attention politique ne se concentrent sur les racines profondes de la pauvreté, de la fragilité des États et du changement environnemental mondial.

« Le miroir tendu par le Rapport mondial sur les déplacements internes renvoie un reflet peu flatteur : celui de l’indifférence de la communauté internationale, du manque de responsabilité et de l’incapacité des États à protéger leurs propres citoyens », déplore Alexandra Bilak.

Download Global Press Release: French

أكثر من 31 مليون شخص نزحوا داخل بلادهم عام 2016

الاثنين، الموافق 22 مايو/أيار 2017 (جنيف / نيويورك): لقد تسبب النزاع والعنف والكوارث بحالات نزوح داخلي جديدة بلغ عددها 31.1 مليون حالة عام 2016، وفقًا لتقرير جديد صدر اليوم عن مركز رصد النزوح الداخلي (IDMC) والمجلس النرويجي للاجئين.

وأفاد جان إيغلاند، الأمين العام للمجلس النرويجي للاجئين أنه "في عام 2016، أجبر شخص واحد في كل ثانية على الفرار من منزله داخل بلده. والآن فقد أصبح عدد النازحين داخليًا يفوق عدد اللاجئين بنسبة اثنين إلى واحد. وهنالك حاجة ملحة لإعادة إدراج مسألة النزوح الداخلي في جدول الأعمال العالمي".

ومن بين 6.9 مليون حالة نزوح داخلي جديدة ناجمة عن النزاع عام 2016، كان هنالك 2.6 مليون حالة حدثت في أفريقيا جنوب الصحراء الكبرى، وفقًا للتقرير العالمي بشأن النزوح الداخلي. وكانت جمهورية كونغو الديمقراطية البلد الأشد تضررًا، حيث ارتفع عدد حالات النزوح إلى 922,000 حالة جديدة خلال العام وحده. ويلي ذلك سوريا (824,000)، ثم العراق (659,000)، ثم أفغانستان (653,000)، ثم نيجيريا (501,000)، ثم اليمن (478,000). وبحلول نهاية عام 2016، نزح ما مجموعه 40.3 مليون شخص داخل بلدهم نتيجة للنزاع والعنف، وكان بعض منهم قد نزح منذ عقود.

وأفادت ألكساندرا بيلاك، مديرة مركز رصد النزوح الداخلي: "أن بعض الدول انسحبت من جدول الأعمال الدولي لتظهر مرة أخرى بعد بضع سنوات ولديها أعداد كبيرة من حالات النزوح الجديدة". "وهذا هو الحال بالنسبة لجمهورية كونغو الديمقراطية، مما يلقي الضوء على كيفية تسبب الفشل في معالجة الأسباب الكامنة وراء النزاع والأزمة بأنماط دورية من النزوح".

تتسبب الكوارث في نزوح ثلاثة أضعاف الأشخاص النازحين بفعل النزاعات. وقد ارتبطت معظم حالات النزوح الجديدة بفعل الكوارث عام 2016 والتي بلغت 24 مليون حالة بالمخاطر المناخية المفاجئة كالفيضانات، والعواصف، والحرائق الطبيعية، والظروف الشتوية القاسية. وغالبًا ما يحدث النزوح بفعل الكوارث في البلدان ذات الدخل المنخفض وبلدان الشريحة الدنيا من فئة الدخل المتوسط، ومن المتوقع أن يزداد في المستقبل بفعل تأثيرات التغير المناخي والطقس الأكثر تطرفًا.

وأضافت بيلاك: "على الرغم من كون النزوح الداخلي نقطة انطلاق للعديد من الرحلات القادمة إلا أن التركيز العالمي الحالي على اللاجئين والمهاجرين قد تغلب عليه. وينبغي لنا أن نعترف بأن الشخص الذي نزح داخليًا اليوم قد يصبح لاجئًا، أو طالبًا للجوء، أو مهاجرًا دوليًا في الغد إن لم يحصل على النوع الملائم من الدعم والحماية".

ومع ذلك، فقد تم بذل المزيد من المساعدات في العام الماضي من أجل إعادة توطين اللاجئين داخل البلدان المانحة بشكل أكبر من البلدان التي نشأت فيها أزمات النزوح.

ويشير التقرير العالمي بشأن النزوح الداخلي إلى أن النزوح سيستمر ما لم نوجه التمويل والاهتمام السياسي نحو الدوافع الكامنة وراء الفقر، وضعف الدولة، والتغير البيئي العالمي.

Más de 31 millones de personas fueron desplazadas dentro de su propio país en 2016

Los conflictos, la violencia y los desastres provocaron 31,1 millones de nuevos desplazamientos internos en 2016, según un nuevo informe publicado hoy por el Observatorio de Desplazamiento Interno (IDMC) y el Consejo Noruego para Refugiados (NRC).

"En 2016, cada segundo una persona se vio obligada a huir de su hogar dentro de su propio país. El número de desplazados internos ahora supera por el doble al número de refugiados. Es urgente volver a poner el tema del desplazamiento interno en la agenda mundial", dijo Jan Egeland, Secretario General del NRC.

De los 6,9 millones de nuevos desplazamientos internos provocados por los conflictos en 2016, 2,6 millones se llevaron a cabo en el África subsahariana, según el Informe Mundial sobre Desplazamiento Interno. La República Democrática del Congo fue el país más afectado, con un incremento de 922.000 nuevos desplazamientos durante el año solo en ese país. Los siguientes países fueron Siria (824.000), Irak (659.000), Afganistán (653.000), Nigeria (501.000) y Yemen (478.000). Hasta finales de 2016, un total de 40,3 millones de personas fueron desplazadas dentro de su propio país como consecuencia de los conflictos y violencia, y algunas de ellas ya han estado desplazadas durante décadas.

"Algunos países se apartan de la agenda internacional pero resurgen unos años más tarde con cifras significativas de nuevos desplazamientos", dijo Alexandra Bilak, Directora del IDMC. "Este fue el caso de la República Democrática del Congo, lo que pone en evidencia cómo la ausencia de soluciones para abordar las causas subyacentes de los conflictos y las crisis resulta en patrones cíclicos de desplazamiento".

Los desastres desplazaron tres veces más personas que los conflictos. La mayoría de los 24 millones de nuevos desplazamientos provocados por desastres registrados en 2016 está vinculada a riesgos meteorológicos repentinos tales como inundaciones, tormentas, incendios forestales y condiciones invernales severas. El desplazamiento provocado por desastres ocurre sobre todo en países de ingresos bajos y medio-bajos, y se espera que aumente en el futuro con el impacto del cambio climático y más fenómenos meteorológicos extremos.

"A pesar de que el desplazamiento interno es el punto de partida de muchos viajes sin regreso, en la actualidad ha sido eclipsado por el enfoque global en los refugiados y los migrantes. Tenemos que reconocer que, sin el tipo adecuado de apoyo y protección, un desplazado interno hoy puede convertirse en un refugiado, un solicitante de asilo o un migrante internacional mañana", dijo Bilak.

Sin embargo, el año pasado se gastó más en ayuda para el reasentamiento de refugiados en países donantes que en los países donde se originan las crisis de desplazamiento.

El Informe Mundial sobre Desplazamiento Interno señala que el fenómeno del desplazamiento continuará a menos que dirijamos la atención política y los fondos a los factores subyacentes de la pobreza, la fragilidad del estado y el cambio ambiental global.

"Los hallazgos del Informe Mundial sobre Desplazamiento Interno reflejan una situación de indiferencia internacional, ausencia de rendición de cuentas y fracaso de los Estados para proteger a su propia gente," dijo Bilak.

Download Global Press Release: Spanish

2016年超过3100万人在其国境内流徙

根据境内流徙监测中心(IDMC)和挪威难民理事会(NRC)今天发布的新报告,2016年内冲突,暴力和灾 害增添了3100万境内流徙人数。

挪威难民理事会秘书长Jan Egeland 指出,“在2016年,每秒钟有一个人被逼要离开家园,在自己国家迁徙。境内流徙人数现在是难民人数两倍,急需把境内流徙放回国际议题中。”

根据全球境内流徙报告,2016年中690万因冲突引致的境内流徙中,260万发生在非洲撒哈拉以南。刚果民主共和国是最严重受影响国家,单单一年就达到92.2万新流徙人口,其次是叙利亚(82.4万),伊拉克(65.9万),阿富汗(65.3万),尼日利亚(50.1万)和也门(47.8万)。直至2016年底,共有4030万人在自己国家因冲突和暴力流徙,其中有些已经流徙了几十年。

境内流徙监测中心局长Alexandra Bilak 表示,“有些国家在国际议程中消失了,但几年后带着显著流徙数字再度出现,例如刚果民主共和国,因没有面对冲突和危机背后的成因,而出现周期性模式流徙。”

灾害比冲突导致三倍更多的流徙人口。大部分2016年记录的2400万新灾害流徙人口皆因突来的自然灾害如水灾,风灾,山火和严峻冬天产生的。灾害流徙大多发生在低和中低收入国家,相信随着气候改变和更极端天气将会越发产生。

Bilak表示,“虽然境内流徙是很多进一步旅途的起始点,它却被目前难民和移民的全球焦点所掩盖。我们要承认,没有正确的支援和保护,一个今天境内流徙的人明天可能成为一个难民,或申请避难人士或国际移民。”

然而去年捐助国花在本国安置难民的经费比援助流徙危机产生国更多。

全球境内流徙报告显示,流徙会继续,除非我们把拨款和政治关注放在导致贫穷,国家不稳和全球环境改变的背后原因。

Bilak说,“如果全球境内流徙报告是一面镜子,它反照的是国际漠不关心,不追究责任和国家没有保护自己人民的失败。”

Download Global Press Release: Chinese
Language:

Africa hardest hit by internal displacement in 2016, according to new report

In 2016, conflict and violence displaced more people in Sub-Saharan Africa than in the Middle East, according to a report released today by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC).

Of the 6.9 million new internal displacements by conflict in 2016, 2.6 million took place in Sub-Saharan Africa, and 2.1 million in the Middle East and North Africa, according to the Global Report on Internal Displacement. The Democratic Republic of the Congo was the country worst affected, with a spike of 922,000 new displacements during the year. Next were Syria (824,000), Iraq (659,000), Afghanistan (653,000), Nigeria (501,000) and Yemen (478,000).

“Certain countries drop off the international agenda only to re-emerge a few years later with significant numbers of new displacements,” said Alexandra Bilak, Director of IDMC. “This was the case for the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which highlights how the failure to address the underlying causes of conflict and crisis results in cyclical patterns of displacement.”

Globally, conflict, violence and disasters caused 31.1 million new instances of internal displacement in 2016. Disasters displaced three times more people than conflicts. Most of the 24.2 million new disaster displacements recorded during the year were linked to weather hazards such as floods, storms, wildfires and severe winter conditions. Disaster displacement occurs mostly in low and lower-middle income countries, and is expected to increase in the future with the impacts of climate change and more extreme weather.

As of the end of 2016, a total of 40.3 million people were displaced within their own country as a result of conflict and violence, some of whom having been displaced for decades. NRC’s Secretary General Jan Egeland said: “In 2016, one person every second was forced to flee their home inside their own country. Internally displaced people now outnumber refugees by two to one. It is therefore urgent to put internal displacement back on the global agenda.”

In Ethiopia, Mozambique, Somalia and South Sudan, it is sometimes difficult to make a clear distinction between conflict and disasters as the main trigger for displacement, as the phenomenon there is so multi-causal. Droughts, poor access to basic services and infrastructure, lack of livelihoods, hunger and ongoing conflict converge in a toxic mix that leaves people no other option but to flee.

This year, IDMC’s Global Report examines the complex links between internal displacement and cross-border movement, highlighting, for example, the situation of many South Sudanese crossing in and out of the country in search of protection. The report also shows how unsafe returns could lead to more internal displacement in the future: in 2016, 67,000 Somali refugees returned from Kenya to a country still struggling with a food security crisis and the impacts of armed conflict.

Bilak said: “Despite internal displacement being the starting point of many onward journeys, it has been overshadowed by the current global focus on refugees and migrants. We need to acknowledge that, without the right kind of support and protection, a person internally displaced today may become a refugee, an asylum seeker or an international migrant tomorrow.”

Yet more aid was spent last year on refugee resettlement within donor countries than in the countries where displacement crises originate. The Global Report on Internal Displacement shows that displacement will continue unless funding and political attention is directed to the underlying drivers of poverty, state fragility and global environmental change.

The Global Report on Internal Displacement shows that displacement will continue unless we direct funding and political attention to the underlying drivers of poverty, state fragility and global environmental change.

“To the extent that the Global Report on Internal Displacement holds up a mirror, the reflection it projects is one of international indifference, lack of accountability and states’ failure to protect their own people,” said Bilak.

Two million internally displaced in Middle East and North Africa in 2016, says new report

Conflict and violence caused 2.1 million new internal displacements in the Middle East and North Africa in 2016, with the highest numbers in Syria (824,000), Iraq (659,000) and Yemen (478,000), according to a report released today by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC).

NRC title name said: “The Global Report on Internal Displacement is a grim reminder of how severe the protection needs of millions of people across the Middle East have become. It highlights that some families in Syria have been uprooted as many as 25 times over the six years of armed conflict. Increasingly desperate for safety, many have been forced to make the perilous journey abroad.”

The report examines the complex links between internal displacement and cross-border movement, and highlights how unsafe returns could also lead to more internal displacement in the future.

IDMC Director Alexandra Bilak said: “Despite internal displacement being the starting point of many onward journeys, it has been overshadowed by the current global focus on refugees and migrants. We need to acknowledge that, without the right kind of support and protection, a person internally displaced today may become a refugee, an asylum seeker or an international migrant tomorrow.”

Yet more aid was spent last year on refugee resettlement within donor countries than in the countries where displacement crises originate.

Globally, conflict, violence and disasters caused 31.1 million new internal displacements in 2016. Most of the 24.2 million new disaster displacements recorded in 2016 were linked to weather hazards such as floods, storms, wildfires and severe winter conditions.

As of the end of 2016, a total of 40.3 million people were displaced within their own country as a result of conflict and violence, some of whom having been displaced for decades. NRC Secretary General Jan Egeland said: "Internally displaced people now outnumber refugees by two to one. It is therefore urgent to put internal displacement back on the global agenda.”

The Global Report on Internal Displacement shows that displacement will continue unless funding and political attention is directed to the underlying drivers of poverty, state fragility and global environmental change.

“To the extent that the Global Report on Internal Displacement holds up a mirror, the reflection it projects is one of international indifference, lack of accountability and states’ failure to protect their own people,” said Bilak.

Conflict and violence forced 400,000 from their homes in Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016, says new report

Conflict and criminal or gang violence forced 400,000 people in Latin America and the Caribbean to flee within their own country in 2016, according to a report released today by the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) and the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC).

Inside El Salvador alone, 220,000 were internally displaced by violence, forced disappearances and sexual violence in 2016, according to the Global Report on Internal Displacement. Colombia (171,000), Mexico (23,000), Honduras (16,000) and Guatemala (6,200) also saw significant numbers of people displaced by violence .

In all, 8.1 million people were living in displacement in Latin America and the Caribbean because of conflict and violence at the end of 2016, illustrating the often protracted nature of internal displacement.

Globally, conflict, violence and disasters caused 31.1 million new internal displacements in 2016. Disasters displaced three times more people than conflicts with 24.2 million compared to 6.9 million. Most of the new disaster displacements recorded in 2016 were linked to weather hazards such as floods, storms, wildfires and severe winter conditions.

Another 1.8 million people were displaced by disasters in the region, most of whom in Cuba, where Hurricane Mathew forced almost one in 10 inhabitants to leave their homes and shelter in safer locations. With many countries in the region already struggling to manage disaster risk, with climate change and intensifying extreme weather events, the scale of future displacement events can be expected to increase.

NRC JOB NAME said: “The mass evacuation of over one million people in six eastern provinces of Cuba ahead of Hurricane Matthew in October was the largest disaster evacuation anywhere during 2016. While such mass evacuations force people from their homes, they also show that disaster preparedness saves lives. In contrast, other small low-lying island states like Haiti suffered disproportionately from the disaster with displacement occurring as a result of weak governance capacity and high vulnerability to regular hazard events.”

NRC Secretary General Jan Egeland said: “In 2016, one person every second was forced to flee their home inside their own country. Internally displaced people now outnumber refugees by two to one. It is urgent to put internal displacement back on the global agenda.”

The report found a clear relationship between internal displacement and cross-border movement. For example, 70 per cent of female asylum seekers from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras were internally displaced before making the decision to flee abroad.

IDMC Director Alexandra Bilak said: “Despite internal displacement being the starting point of many onward journeys, it has been overshadowed by the current global focus on refugees and migrants. We need to acknowledge that, without the right kind of support and protection, a person internally displaced today may become a refugee, an asylum seeker or an international migrant tomorrow.” Yet more aid was spent last year on refugee resettlement within donor countries than in the countries where displacement crises originate.

The Global Report on Internal Displacement shows that displacement will continue unless we direct funding and political attention to the underlying drivers of poverty, state fragility and global environmental change.

“To the extent that the Global Report on Internal Displacement holds up a mirror, the reflection it projects is one of international indifference, lack of accountability and states’ failure to protect their own people,” said Bilak.

Staff:
Biography

Jan Egeland

Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council

Jan Egeland has over 30 years of experience from international work with humanitarian crises, situations, human rights and conflict resolution. He chairs the UN/ISSG Task Force on Humanitarian Access in Syria, as well as the Humanitarian Leadership Academy.

Egeland also sits on the High-Level Panel on Humanitarian Cash Transfers and is part of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Humanitarian Response.

As UN Under Secretary General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator from 2003 to 2006, he helped reform the global humanitarian response system. From 2011 to 2013, he was the Europe Director of Human Rights Watch, prior to joining the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) where he took up his post as Secretary General in August 2013

From 1999 to 2002, he was the UN Secretary-General’s Special Adviser on Colombia, and from 1990 to 1997 he served as State Secretary in the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs where he was among the initiators of the peace negotiations that led to the Oslo accords between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organisation PLO in 1993.

As Secretary General of NRC, he is a courageous spokesperson for the displaced people in the world. Through his career, he has built experience and expertise that makes him uniquely qualified to lead the organisation towards its vision of ’Rights Respected and People Protected’. 

Languages: English & Norwegian

Jan will be in New York on 21 May and 22 May 2017.

Biography

Alexandra Bilak

Director, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC)

Alexandra Bilak is the Director of the Geneva-based Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC). She leads a team of experts providing global estimates and analysis on internal displacement worldwide. Prior to becoming Director, Alexandra led IDMC’s Policy and Research work on displacement in the context of conflict and violence, disasters and climate change, and development investments

Alexandra has over fifteen years’ experience working on evidence-based policy development, strategy, programme design and delivery. Between 2004 and 2014, she lived in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Kenya, where she worked for various research institutes and international NGOs and managed research and advocacy programmes on conflict and forced migration. Alexandra has authored a number of articles and reports on forced displacement, return and local integration, inter-community conflict, conflict transformation and civil society development. She now directs the annual publication of IDMC’s flagship Global Report on Internal Displacement (GRID), and has particular interest in understanding the structural drivers and economic impacts of protracted and recurrent internal displacement.

Alexandra holds a Master’s degree in International Politics from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) in London, and a DEA in African Studies and Political Science from the University of Paris I Panthéon-Sorbonne.

Languages: English and French

Alexandra will be in New York from 21 May until 23 May 2017.

Biography

Bina Desai

Head of Policy and Research, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC)

Bina has extensive programme and research experience on socio-economic development in low income countries. She has worked in Bangladesh, Ghana, Honduras, India, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique and the Philippines and her research interests include the structural causes of crises, economic and development impacts of disaster and conflict, internal displacement and forced migration. She has worked for the German Ministry for Development, the Aga Khan Development Network, Christian Aid and UNISDR. Since 2010, she served as UNISDR’s Policy and Research Coordinator and has co-authored and led the production of the Global Assessment Reports (GARs) since 2011. In spring 2017, Bina joined IDMC as the Head of Policy & Research and is responsible for heading IDMC's team of senior advisors and researchers, working closely with the Data & Analysis and Communications teams on displacement-related policy and evidence building. Bina holds a Masters in Economics and Sociology and a PhD in Social Anthropology from the School of Oriental and African Studies in London.

Languages: English and German

Expertise: Socio-economic drivers of displacement, disaster displacement risk, economic impacts of displacement, and resilience building.

Bina will be in Cancun from 22 May until 27 May 2017.

Biography

Michelle Yonetani

Senior Strategic Advisor, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC)

Michelle has led IDMC’s work on displacement in the context of disasters and climate change since late 2010, including the development of global statistics and methodology, research, policy analysis and advocacy. Prior to joining IDMC, she spent over 10 years working with NGOs and civil society organisations on humanitarian and development policy and programming, particularly in Asia. Her current focus areas include building knowledge about protracted displacement and displacement in the context of slow-onset disasters and environmental change. She closely follows policy on disaster risk reduction and climate change and is a member of the Task Force on Displacement under the UNFCCC Warsaw International Mechanism on loss and damage associated with climate change, as a technical expert and representative of the non-UN members of the Advisory Group on Human Mobility and Climate change (NRC, Refugees International, RAED and the Hugo Observatory/University of Liege). Michelle has a Masters in International Policy from the Monterey Institute of International Studies.

Languages: English

Expertise: Displacement in the context of disasters and climate change

Michelle will be in Cancun from 21 May 2017 until 27 May.

Biography

Justin Ginnetti

Head of Data and Analysis, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC)

Justin Ginnetti is IDMC’s head of Data and Analysis. He joined IDMC in 2012 after having served as a policy officer at the UN’s office of disaster risk reduction (UNISDR) where he worked on the Global Assessment Report. He served as a chapter scientist and contributing author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Extreme Events and Disasters (SREX), and the World Meteorological Organisation’s guidance on assessing droughts. At IDMC, Justin and his team are responsible for all of the figures in the Global Report on Internal Displacement. He also leads IDMC’s efforts to estimate future displacement risk, assess displacement associated with slow-onset hazards, detect incidents of internal displacement and fill gaps in data through the use of mathematical models, analysis of “big data” and new technologies.

Justin holds a master’s degree in law and diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University, where he studied climate change-induced displacement and forced migration of agro-pastoralists in the Horn of Africa. Previously, he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English literature from the University of Pennsylvania.

Languages: English and French

Expertise: Data analysis, innovation, climate change and disaster risk

Justin will be available for interviews in Geneva from 22 May 2017.

Biography

Nadine Walicki

Senior Strategic Advisor, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC)

With over a decade of research and policy experience on internal displacement, Nadine is leading the development of IDMC’s monitoring methodology, research agenda and policy influencing strategy on displacement caused by development projects. Her research has covered communities displaced by development projects, armed conflict and disaster risk reduction efforts, and has included field research in the Balkans, Caucasus, Central Asia and India. Before joining IDMC, Nadine worked on forced migration issues at the International Organization for Migration and the Government of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Board. She has a Master degree in European and Russian Studies and Bachelor degrees in Russian Studies and Chemistry.

Justin holds a master’s degree in law and diplomacy from the Fletcher School at Tufts University, where he studied climate change-induced displacement and forced migration of agro-pastoralists in the Horn of Africa. Previously, he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English literature from the University of Pennsylvania.

Languages: English and Russian

Expertise: Displacement in the context of development projects

Nadine will be available for interviews in Geneva from 22 May 2017.

Biography

Elizabeth J. Rushing

Senior Strategic Advisor, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC)

Elizabeth J. Rushing is IDMC’s Senior Strategic Advisor on internal displacement in the context of armed conflict and violence. She joined IDMC in 2012, bringing nearly a decade of human rights and humanitarian legal and policy-oriented experience, principally from West and Central Africa. She currently leads IDMC's research and analysis on the drivers, patterns and impacts of internal displacement crises in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa, as well as the ongoing displacement in Central America and Mexico spurred by drug trafficking and gang-related violence.

Elizabeth has worked for the International Committee of the Red Cross, UNAIDS, la Fédération Internationale des Droits de l'Homme and OHCHR. She holds a Juris Doctor from the American University Washington College of Law and a Masters in International Human Rights Law from the University of Paris at Nanterre. She is fluent in English and French, speaks Italian conversationally and has a basic knowledge of Mandarin and Spanish.

Languages: English and French

Expertise: Displacement in the context of conflict and violence

Elizabeth will be available for interviews in Geneva from 22 May 2017.

For interviews in New York and Cancun please contact:

Ms Sian Bowen

Head of Communications

Ms Francesca Da Ros (Geneva)

Communications Coordinator

For interviews in Geneva please contact:

Ms Rosemarie North

Reporting Coordinator

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